Orange Media publications are official student-produced mediums of news and information published by the Journalism students of Olentangy Orange High School. The publications have been established as a designated public forum for student journalists to inform, educate and entertain readers as well as for the discussion of issues of concern to their audience. They  will not be reviewed or restrained by school officials, adults or sources prior to publication.

The content of the publications is determined by and reflects only the views of the student staff and not school officials or the school itself. They will not publish any material, determined by the staff or adviser, that is libelous, obscene or disruptive to the school day.

The advisers are Kari Phillips and Brian Nicola. Readers may respond to the publications through Letters to the Editor. Letters may be mailed, e-mailed to thecourierstaff@gmail.com or dropped off to room 2223. The staff asks that submissions be 300 words or less and contain the author’s name and signature. Editors reserve the right to edit or withhold publication of letters.

The publications strive to uphold the Canons of Professional Journalism, which includes accuracy, impartiality, etc. Therefore, major errors will be corrected in the next issue. Distinction will be marked between news and opinion stories.

Tha Carter V: A critique

December 15, 2018

After seven years of waiting, Lil Wayne has finally come out with the fifth installment of his Carter projects, dubbing it “Tha Carter V”. The series of albums first started in June 2004 and continued into the fourth project ending in August 2011. Ever since, Lil Wayne has been in legal battles with his label for the rights to release “Tha Carter V,” which gained a massive amount of media attention and talk in the music industry, according to complex.com.

 

Over the years, this series of has gone to gross in 8.7 million copies so far. With the release of Tha Carter V on Sept. 28, fans all over were more than excited to see what it had to offer after such an anticipated wait. After listening to the entire album more than multiple times, I can say I’m glad I waited.

 

The tracklist consists of 23 songs with four features from big name artists Travis Scott, Nicki Minaj, Nivea, and xxxtentacion, who died earlier this year. Although the album doesn’t have a lot of guest features, I think Lil Wayne’s raw talent picks up anything the album is lacking.

 

The first three tracks on the album were definitely meant to be there, as they do a lot to start off the album with some energy. The xxxtentacion feature in the leadoff track “Don’t Cry” serves more as background vocals more than anything. However, it still gives a lot of emotion to a song that was already empowering with Lil Wayne’s slow but steady flow throughout the song.

 

“Dedicate” is also an honorable mention at song number three with Wayne not holding back from throwing as much word play and delicate verses as he can at his audience. Lines like “Billion dollar smile, I sell myself short if I grin, I’m bargaining then” fit Lil Wayne’s style perfectly with how he’s able to mesh words together to make funny and thoughtful pieces of work.

 

Tracks four to 14 were a lot slower song beats that cater to Lil Wayne speeding them up with some of his lyrics. “Let it Fly” featuring Travis Scott was no disappointment with high energy flows and a steady beat. Not to mention songs like “Can’t Be Broken” and “Open Letter” do a lot to prove to me that Lil Wayne can still hold his own and isn’t reliant on features.

 

The rest of the album seemed to be a little bit of filler with hints of solid beats like the songs “Used To” and “Let it All Work Out”. Although there wasn’t anything crazy special about these tracks, that’s not saying Lil Wayne was lackluster until the end of the album. Especially since “Tha Carter V” had a record tying 22 (out of 23) songs on the album making it on Billboard's Hot 100.

 

Overall, Lil Wayne didn’t fight for seven years for this album to be released. The first half of the project is outstanding and does nothing but show how even at 36, Lil Wayne still has his place in modern music and will go down as one of the best of our time. While the rest of the album is nowhere near bad, it just gives more of the Wayne people were missing out on all of these years.

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