Orange Media publications are official student-produced mediums of news and information published by the Journalism students of Olentangy Orange High School. The publications have been established as a designated public forum for student journalists to inform, educate and entertain readers as well as for the discussion of issues of concern to their audience. They  will not be reviewed or restrained by school officials, adults or sources prior to publication.

The content of the publications is determined by and reflects only the views of the student staff and not school officials or the school itself. They will not publish any material, determined by the staff or adviser, that is libelous, obscene or disruptive to the school day.

The advisers are Kari Phillips and Brian Nicola. Readers may respond to the publications through Letters to the Editor. Letters may be mailed, e-mailed to thecourierstaff@gmail.com or dropped off to room 2223. The staff asks that submissions be 300 words or less and contain the author’s name and signature. Editors reserve the right to edit or withhold publication of letters.

The publications strive to uphold the Canons of Professional Journalism, which includes accuracy, impartiality, etc. Therefore, major errors will be corrected in the next issue. Distinction will be marked between news and opinion stories.

Who you gonna call?

November 16, 2018

The wind howls outside the window and forces the tree branch to do a repetitive tap against the glass. The creaking of the bedroom door startles you awake. Looking around, you scream as you see a human--like figure at the end of the bed.

 

The truth about ghosts

 

The possibility of paranormal creatures such as ghosts and spirits have always been a fascination to the human mind. Lynn White, a psychic and owner of The Powell Psychic, is well aware of that fascination.

 

From the time she was young, White has had a connection to the metaphysical realm. “When I was a little kid, I always saw strange things. Sometimes it was just from the corner of my eye, but other times it was very real or vivid,” White said.

 

Some may speculate on the difference between spirits and ghosts, but according to White, they’re one in the same. “The term ‘spirits’ sounds special. Really it’s just a different word for the same thing, that evokes a completely different emotion,” White said.

 

For people who wonder about the connection they have with their passed loved ones, White believes that the connection is still there. “If your grandma passed and you guys were very close, if you think about her or need her to come she will be there. You can always pull them to you just by thinking of them,” White said.

 

Her story

 

White has had quite a few ghostly encounters of her own. “One time my husband and I were lying in bed and something woke me up. The windows were open, -so I thought it was just the wind from outside. I saw movement in the bedroom and then my husband standing in the doorway,” White said.

 

Her husband was dressed in his day-to-day clothes and when she asked him where he was going the only response she got sounded “like an adult or teacher from Charlie Brown.” White said. White found herself angry with her husband and began to get yell at him.

 

While glancing around the room, she saw that her husband was asleep in bed next to her. The thing she was talking to wasn’t her husband, but a ghost.

 

The haunted house

 

The Paredes family home has been haunted by a ghost named Josefina for the past two years. “It all started when my mom lied about not being able to go to someone's funeral,” senior Marcy Paredes said.

 

“The same night that the funeral was she [my mom] was washing dishes and putting wine glasses on the side of the counter,” Paredes said. All of the sudden one of the wine glasses fell to the floor. 

 

“Later that night, she was walking upstairs to go to bed and the garage door started going up,” Paredes said. The garage door didn’t start because of any human action; the family believes that it was the ghost of Josefina making her presence known.

 

“One time I was sitting at the table, and I had a plate in my hand. I set it down and turned around. When I looked at the plate, it had shattered into a million pieces. I hadn’t even put it down hard,” Paredes said. “It was definitely Josefina.”

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