Orange Media publications are official student-produced mediums of news and information published by the Journalism students of Olentangy Orange High School. The publications have been established as a designated public forum for student journalists to inform, educate and entertain readers as well as for the discussion of issues of concern to their audience. They  will not be reviewed or restrained by school officials, adults or sources prior to publication.

The content of the publications is determined by and reflects only the views of the student staff and not school officials or the school itself. They will not publish any material, determined by the staff or adviser, that is libelous, obscene or disruptive to the school day.

The advisers are Kari Phillips and Brian Nicola. Readers may respond to the publications through Letters to the Editor. Letters may be mailed, e-mailed to thecourierstaff@gmail.com or dropped off to room 2223. The staff asks that submissions be 300 words or less and contain the author’s name and signature. Editors reserve the right to edit or withhold publication of letters.

The publications strive to uphold the Canons of Professional Journalism, which includes accuracy, impartiality, etc. Therefore, major errors will be corrected in the next issue. Distinction will be marked between news and opinion stories.

Sense and Sensibility: Getting a sense of what's behind the curtain

October 18, 2018

Witness social pressure at its peak in the upcoming fall play, an adaptation of the timeless Jane Austen novel, “Sense and Sensibility,” running Sept. 27-30.

The show is centered on the late 1700s and early 1800s of England during the regency period.

 

“The basic story is about three girls, whose father died recently, and they are left to face the situation of how the laws work at the time. The girls and their mother are left with nothing, and most of them are at marrying age,” director Cathy Swain-Abrams said. “It's hard for them to find someone to marry them with nothing.”

 

The show also features characters called ‘Gossips’ who clear up confusion through the filter of “dad, did you hear that?”

 

Auditions for the play took place at the end of the last academic year. Students were casted based upon their overall audition as well as their stage chemistry. The reason for this was to help lighten the stress of the cast, many of whom are in band or choir.

 

“We shifted this to help all of the band, choir and other performing arts students because they usually get busy during the month of October,” Swain-Abrams said.

 

Junior Melia McCoy, who is playing the role of Margaret Dashwood, was on tech for the musical and the play last year. She is excited to have an important role in this year’s show.

 

“The play is different than last year’s play. It’s still a period piece, but instead of the 60’s, it’s 1790s England. It’s not a socially-relevant play in my opinion; it's more of a timeless piece,” McCoy said. “There’s those coming-of-age elements and family overcoming grief, which I think everyone can relate too.”

 

Some of the other leads in the play include senior Haley Morman, who is playing Marianne, and senior Angelica Dzodzomenyo, who is playing Elinor.

 

McCoy, as well as many other people organizing this play, are enthusiastic about the new additions to this show, including a revolving stage.

 

“Swain-Abrams is doing a non-traditional staging, which I’m super excited for. This show is very movement-involved to portray emotions,” McCoy said.

 

Rehearsals first went until 7p.m., but now end at 9 p.m. Another change to the rehearsals process is that now, there are particular scenes rehearsed on specific days, and only those in that particular scene need to be present.

 

“Typically, a lot of people, although some love the classics, think they are boring,” Swain-Abrams said. “It's not going to feel like reading a novel.

 

“I want to encourage people that it’s not going to be what a lot of students would think of as reading a Jane Austen novel. It's going to be modern and quick paced.”

 

Tickets can be bought either during school lunches or online on the webpage www.oohsoh.booktix.com. They are $6 for students, OLSD employees and senior citizens and $10 for adults.

 

Whether it’s to see the play adaptation of the renowned Jane Austen novel or if it’s just to go have fun, seeing the students at the high school showcase their months of hard work and practice is truly an experience.

Please reload

archives

Print Editions

Online Editions

Please reload

sections

Please reload

This site was designed with the
.com
website builder. Create your website today.
Start Now