Orange Media publications are official student-produced mediums of news and information published by the Journalism students of Olentangy Orange High School. The publications have been established as a designated public forum for student journalists to inform, educate and entertain readers as well as for the discussion of issues of concern to their audience. They  will not be reviewed or restrained by school officials, adults or sources prior to publication.

The content of the publications is determined by and reflects only the views of the student staff and not school officials or the school itself. They will not publish any material, determined by the staff or adviser, that is libelous, obscene or disruptive to the school day.

The advisers are Kari Phillips and Brian Nicola. Readers may respond to the publications through Letters to the Editor. Letters may be mailed, e-mailed to thecourierstaff@gmail.com or dropped off to room 2223. The staff asks that submissions be 300 words or less and contain the author’s name and signature. Editors reserve the right to edit or withhold publication of letters.

The publications strive to uphold the Canons of Professional Journalism, which includes accuracy, impartiality, etc. Therefore, major errors will be corrected in the next issue. Distinction will be marked between news and opinion stories.

Unrecognized underdogs: Junior varsity teams work just as hard, get less recognition than varsity

September 24, 2018

Throughout high school, there are many athletic teams to join. Some more popular than the other, yet for each of the sports, there is a varsity and a junior varsity team. Everyone’s goal is to make varsity. There’s a few benefits, even if it’s the same sport, with the same rules.

 

The varsity team is mainly picked based on skill set and experience. However, that doesn't mean that the junior varsity team is bad at all, sometimes they will put people they couldn't fit onto the junior varsity. There is much potential and plenty of good players on the junior varsity team.

 

Most people assume a player’s skill level based on the team they make. When the team they make individually benefits their different types of play, the amount of effort and hard work each person gives truly shows how good a player is.

 

Freshman and varsity field hockey player Sammy Myers said,“If someone who puts a lot of work in compared to someone who doesn’t really care as much in the end, the person who works hard will end up being better,” It’s more about perseverance and working hard than just being able to play well. As long as the athlete is doing their absolute best and working to get better, they’re already a good player and should keep it up.

 

Another difference between varsity and junior varsity is the amount of credit and support either of them get. Usually, the junior varsity team doesn’t get as much credit as the varsity team, even if they practice just as hard, according to Nora Matyac, a freshman soccer player and member of the junior varsity blue team, “Not very many people come to watch [our] games, except family and sometimes close friends, which can be kind of irritating since we put a lot of effort and time into practicing and playing,” Matyac said, “I feel like we just get ignored or degraded, while the varsity teams get all the attention.” The lack of support and care for some of these teams can lead to players not trying as hard and ruining the whole experience for others.

 

In conclusion, junior varsity puts in just as much work as varsity does. They shouldn’t be belittled or ignored, instead they should be given the credit and support deserved. Also, there’s not a massive difference between varsity and junior varsity, it's still the same sport, the only major difference is how much credit you receive for your work and effort.

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