Orange Media publications are official student-produced mediums of news and information published by the Journalism students of Olentangy Orange High School. The publications have been established as a designated public forum for student journalists to inform, educate and entertain readers as well as for the discussion of issues of concern to their audience. They  will not be reviewed or restrained by school officials, adults or sources prior to publication.

The content of the publications is determined by and reflects only the views of the student staff and not school officials or the school itself. They will not publish any material, determined by the staff or adviser, that is libelous, obscene or disruptive to the school day.

The advisers are Kari Phillips and Brian Nicola. Readers may respond to the publications through Letters to the Editor. Letters may be mailed, e-mailed to thecourierstaff@gmail.com or dropped off to room 2223. The staff asks that submissions be 300 words or less and contain the author’s name and signature. Editors reserve the right to edit or withhold publication of letters.

The publications strive to uphold the Canons of Professional Journalism, which includes accuracy, impartiality, etc. Therefore, major errors will be corrected in the next issue. Distinction will be marked between news and opinion stories.

Junior thespians take on "High School Musical"

November 17, 2017

Every other winter, Orangelight Productions hosts a winter musical with thespians from both Olentangy Orange and Olentangy Berkshire Middle Schools. This year, drama teachers Amy Reza and Jeffrey Whiteside, from Orange and Berkshire respectively, will direct one such musical along with OOHS theatre director Cathy Swain-Abrams with the help of various high school mentors.

However, there is a twist this year: the middle school musical will be “High School Musical. Jr.”  Middle school thespians will get the chance to perform the stage version of the well-loved 2006 TV movie musical about friendship and love at the intersection of high school cliques. Classic songs such as “Getcha Head in the Game,” “Stick to the Status Quo,” and “We’re All in This Together” will be included in the stage version, as well as one or two other songs that help the musical flow better on the stage.

After the Oct. 13th announcement, both high schoolers and middle schoolers were excited(and disappointed) for different reasons.

Naturally, middle schoolers were ecstatic about the opportunity to perform this show. “With any age group there is something mystical about portraying characters that are older than you,” Swain-Abrams said.

Seventh grader at OBMS Jessica Mallett, who hoped to snag the role of Gabriella, was surprised yet happy that “High School Musical” was picked. “I thought they would have done something not as popular; I am very excited to hopefully get the experience and I love the “High School Musical” movies,” Mallett said.

Meanwhile, many high schoolers were disappointed that they would not have the chance to perform the show themselves; “High School Musical”  has been a longtime dream show for many students and they felt that the movies were a bigger part of their childhood than younger generations, who might see it as more of a throwback.

However, Swain-Abrams never wanted to do that show with older thespians “I wanted different material than that,” she said. “Hopefully they can experience it themselves because they get to help with the choreography and vocals.”

Junior Sophia Reza will be a mentor for the show and helped kids go through the audition process. Auditions for Orange Middle School took place Nov. 3 and auditions for Berkshire Middle School took place Nov. 6.

“The most popular roles to audition for were Gabriella and Sharpay. There were plenty of hopeful girls who wanted the lead roles,” Reza said.

The audition process was simple, albeit stressful, for the middle school students. First, they learned a dance and did a choreography audition. Then, all auditionees picked a character and performed a pre-selected song for that character in front of a panel of judges.

After both audition dates, callbacks were held. Although auditionees pick a character to try out for, they are considered for more characters than just that one. Many times, someone will get cast as a character they didn’t audition for..

Rehearsals start Nov. 28 and the cast will perform Feb. 1, 2, and 3.

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