Orange Media publications are official student-produced mediums of news and information published by the Journalism students of Olentangy Orange High School. The publications have been established as a designated public forum for student journalists to inform, educate and entertain readers as well as for the discussion of issues of concern to their audience. They  will not be reviewed or restrained by school officials, adults or sources prior to publication.

The content of the publications is determined by and reflects only the views of the student staff and not school officials or the school itself. They will not publish any material, determined by the staff or adviser, that is libelous, obscene or disruptive to the school day.

The advisers are Kari Phillips and Brian Nicola. Readers may respond to the publications through Letters to the Editor. Letters may be mailed, e-mailed to thecourierstaff@gmail.com or dropped off to room 2223. The staff asks that submissions be 300 words or less and contain the author’s name and signature. Editors reserve the right to edit or withhold publication of letters.

The publications strive to uphold the Canons of Professional Journalism, which includes accuracy, impartiality, etc. Therefore, major errors will be corrected in the next issue. Distinction will be marked between news and opinion stories.

Black History Month Assembly Concluding Speech

February 14, 2017

This article is a transcript of the speech given by junior Jackson Schiefelbein at the Black History Month assembly on Feb. 10.

 The theme of this assembly is "Heroes Then, Heroes Now". I understand it may seem that this "heroes club" is exclusive to the celebrities, the wealthy, those who "have a voice", because they’re the ones who we remember. However, when it comes to racial equality, every individual plays a role- this includes us: students, people of all races.


For some, it may seem out of the ordinary that I take this stance, but it shouldn’t have to. I mean, am I not fighting for people’s inherent rights that should be guaranteed to them not only as humans, but as Americans?


 No one should fall victim to discrimination because of their skin color, nor should I receive any benefits or comforts for mine. Even though this is seemingly common knowledge, I still receive second looks -including from my own parents- when I wear this shirt, when I tell people that I have a Black Empowerment club meeting to go to.


 But being white doesn't mean that I can't support Black Lives Matter and racial equality, there was even a time when I didn’t- a time when I didn’t understand the scope of the issue and the implications it creates; but it’s because I'm white that my support for it now has such a powerful effect, and I must use this attention to do good and facilitate equality. Furthermore, it’s important to acknowledge that pro-black does not mean anti-white or anti- any race, at that. It is simply the belief that individuals, regardless of their racial characteristics, are morally, politically, and legally equal and should be treated as such.


That being said, I extend this same power to you all, regardless of race, nationality, religion, personal beliefs. It is up to us to ensure that everyone is treated amicably and equally- something that we have control of within our school.


 I’m asking that you take a stand for what is right- the protection of black rights -rather than ignore it or think of it as not your problem to solve.  Please join me in making the idea of true race equality a reality- one that is supported by everyone as well. In doing so, we will not only overcome the racial prejudices and barriers created in the past, but we will also help our friends, fellow students, and society as a whole. Thank you.

 

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