Awkward date stories

January 8, 2017

 

Every high school teen goes through their fair share of relationships, dates, and heartbreaks. Then there are certain times when almost nobody talks about openly, and that’s the definition of an awkward date.

 

Unsurprisingly, not many people wanted their story or name shared on this topic. But eventually a student, sophomore Jessi Augustine, had a story to share.  

             

“It all started out with me liking this guy. He was a friend of another guy who liked one of my good friends at the time. So we decided that us two and the two other guys were going to go out to eat then see a movie.”

 

Obviously, everyone has high expectations going out with someone somebody likes and they can only hope it works out as planned.

However, all know things don’t always go the way we want. “From the moment we got there, the guy I liked was talking about girls he wanted    and also that he wanted to try and start hanging out with them. I obviously got really upset hearing it.”

 

It’s always hard to react to someone being upset at somebody. Whether to act like they don’t realize it, be apologetic and hope for the best, or get up and quite literally walk away from it, it’s a pretty weird situation.

 

“Once he noticed I was upset he was really apologetic but it got really awkward because he ordered me a cake for dessert, which just made everything really weird once everyone was done with their meal and I was just eating the cake that he got me. The good thing is it was so odd of a situation it made me stop liking him.”

 

Awkward dates don’t always completely ruin crushes and stop further ones from happening though. There’s a lot of times where longterm relationships started off quirky. Take junior Dan Yamaia and his girlfriend for example.

 

“My first date with her was definitely not the usual one you see. We were texting and snapchatting back and forth for a week, and we decided we wanted to hangout. We didn’t really have anything planned though and this was my first time meeting her. We decided I would just go there to pick her up and see where it’d go.”

 

It’s never the greatest idea to wing a date, but it can make for a good memory. Bad dates can easily happen when there’s an agenda too so keep that in mind too.

   

“Once I picked her up, we went to get ice cream where we basically looked at our phones for 20 minutes straight and could only ask each other how our day was or talk about how tired we were. Then we went to a pet store to see dogs and that cycle repeated. I didn’t want to stay there long so we went back to my house, watched a movie quietly, and I dropped her back off.”

 

The good thing is there is always second chances. On top of that, over time people get a lot more comfortable around others they spend time with.

   

“It’s been about three months since that first date and we are still together. We both happily admit that it was the most awkward stage of us knowing each other. With that, now we actually have good conversations rather than being awkward.”

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Orange Media publications are official student-produced mediums of news and information published by the Journalism students of Olentangy Orange High School. The publications have been established as a designated public forum for student journalists to inform, educate and entertain readers as well as for the discussion of issues of concern to their audience. They  will not be reviewed or restrained by school officials, adults or sources prior to publication.

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