Orange Media publications are official student-produced mediums of news and information published by the Journalism students of Olentangy Orange High School. The publications have been established as a designated public forum for student journalists to inform, educate and entertain readers as well as for the discussion of issues of concern to their audience. They  will not be reviewed or restrained by school officials, adults or sources prior to publication.

The content of the publications is determined by and reflects only the views of the student staff and not school officials or the school itself. They will not publish any material, determined by the staff or adviser, that is libelous, obscene or disruptive to the school day.

The advisers are Kari Phillips and Brian Nicola. Readers may respond to the publications through Letters to the Editor. Letters may be mailed, e-mailed to thecourierstaff@gmail.com or dropped off to room 2223. The staff asks that submissions be 300 words or less and contain the author’s name and signature. Editors reserve the right to edit or withhold publication of letters.

The publications strive to uphold the Canons of Professional Journalism, which includes accuracy, impartiality, etc. Therefore, major errors will be corrected in the next issue. Distinction will be marked between news and opinion stories.

Growing green

November 18, 2016

“Marijuana can be the perfect cure for relieving immediate pain,” two-time cancer patient Claire Siegel said. She said she used marijuana the first time cancer struck her around eight years ago and she is open to using it again, now that the cancer has unfortunately returned. Siegel lives in Maryland where medical marijuana is legal, but very hard to get. Both Maryland and Ohio have similar laws regarding marijuana.

 

In September, Ohio became the 25th state to have legalized medical marijuana, according to the New York Times. Increasingly more states are expected to fully legalize medical marijuana. This issue has been subject to great controversy in every state, according to Forbes. 

 

Even though medical marijuana is now partially legalized in Ohio, that does not mean people can smoke whenever they want. According to the Cleveland Plain Dealer, potential users have to get a doctor’s written permission to get medical marijuana, but in order to do that, they need to have one of several chronic conditions or diseases. In other words, it is not easy to obtain a medical marijuana prescription.

 

Over the course of the next two years, the state will set the regulations for cultivators/growers and medical marijuana dispensaries (where medical marijuana is distributed to patients). According to cleveland.com, it will be at least a year or more  before dispensaries open in Ohio. 

 

“It’s going to create a lot of conflict depending on where they place the dispensaries,” said history teacher John Carmichael. “You cannot take marijuana bought legally from another state and bring it back into Ohio.”

 

The Ohio State Board of Pharmacy has determined that any form of marijuana that seems attractive to children will be prohibited. Ohio will allow the use of medical marijuana in the forms of edibles, oils, and vapors.

 

Although medical marijuana is bene official for relieving immediate pain experienced through the treatment of cancer, like Siegel’s case, the process of obtaining medical marijuana legally is anything but immediate.

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