• Ashley Jackson

Speed read: A quick look at the world around you

The Dakota Access Pipeline under construction

The Dakota Access Pipeline plans to carry 570,000 barrels of crude oil each day from the Dakotas to Illinois. The construction of the pipeline would help bring US oil to market, decrease dependency on foreign oil and create an estimated 12,000 jobs, making oil cheaper and more dependable in the United States, according to the pipelines website.

However, there have been many protests about the pipeline from the Native American tribes in the area, as well as environmentalist groups. The Standing Rock Sioux, a tribe against the building of the pipeline, argue that it would damage the environment and their cultural sites.

“This isn’t the first time the United States has ran into a problem like this. This construction is similar to the Keystone Pipeline back in 2010. The pipeline will take an extremely long time to finish,” AP Government teacher John Carmichael said.

Clowns creating terror across the United States

These clowns aren’t the typical sort you’d see at any birthday party. According to The Huffington Post, police in the Carolinas have received more than a dozen reports in the last month from people claiming that clowns, some with white-painted faces, were acting strangely in the area.

The clowns have been spotted in more than 10 different states, and in some cases have been terrorizing citizens. However, police are not sure of their motives and these cases remain under investigation.

“If I saw a clown I would probably cry and run away,” junior Kaci Hargrove said.

New positions in Olentangy

Students and staff have most likely seen one of the the newest additions to Orange walking around in the school parking lot. Ken Bahnick, the school’s new traffic aide, monitors the student parking lot as well the staff and visitor lots, making sure everyone is parking in their designated and appropriate spots.

Another new position at Olentangy is the supervisor of student well-being, Allisha Berendts. As the supervisor, she helps with anything that could be interfering with a student’s learning that is not academically-related; she helps with matters such as mental health, drug and alcohol prevention and intervention, behavioral concerns, learning disabilities and family issues.

“All of the students have been great and very positive towards me. I’m having a great time here at Orange,” said Bahnick.

Franklin County stops Euthanasia

The Franklin County Dog Shelter recently halted plans to euthanize dogs that have been exposed to distemper, a contagious and serious viral illness with no known cure. There have been protests outside of the Franklin County administration building, demanding

information and answers about the mass euthanasia of dogs.

Right now, there are 174 dogs at the shelter, 111 of which are in isolation. Once those dogs test negative for the disease, they will be released for possible adoption.

“It’s really sad to hear about how these innocent dogs had to be killed because of this terrible disease,” junior Jane Koblens, a volunteer at Franklin County Dog Shelter said.

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Orange Media publications are official student-produced mediums of news and information published by the Journalism students of Olentangy Orange High School. The publications have been established as a designated public forum for student journalists to inform, educate and entertain readers as well as for the discussion of issues of concern to their audience. They  will not be reviewed or restrained by school officials, adults or sources prior to publication.

The content of the publications is determined by and reflects only the views of the student staff and not school officials or the school itself. They will not publish any material, determined by the staff or adviser, that is libelous, obscene or disruptive to the school day.

The advisers are Kari Phillips and Brian Nicola. Readers may respond to the publications through Letters to the Editor. Letters may be mailed, e-mailed to thecourierstaff@gmail.com or dropped off to room 2223. The staff asks that submissions be 300 words or less and contain the author’s name and signature. Editors reserve the right to edit or withhold publication of letters.

The publications strive to uphold the Canons of Professional Journalism, which includes accuracy, impartiality, etc. Therefore, major errors will be corrected in the next issue. Distinction will be marked between news and opinion stories.

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